Microelectronic systems and the associated packaging technology are the key technology of current and future mobility solutions. Increasing miniaturization of electronic systems combined with increasing performance and lifetime require the development of new reliable materials, improvement of existing assembly and interconnection techniques as well as the extension of existing analysis and test methods. The focus of our research is on applications in optoelectronics (LED modules) and power electronics.

Due to our close cooperation with various companies from the automotive industry, packaging and interconnection technology, optics manufacturers and many more in different research cooperations, we work very close to the application and always on the most current topics of microelectronics and packaging and interconnection technology. In addition, this enables our students to gain initial insights into possible professional fields in the aforementioned research areas.

Reliable operation of electronic systems over their lifetime is essential. This must be ensured, especially in the automotive sector with its high safety requirements. High operating temperatures and strong mechanical and thermomechanical stress influence the reliability of the systems and require advanced and reliable assembly and interconnection technologies.

 

We in the research group "Microelectronic Packaging" headed by Prof. Dr. Gordon Elger build electronic systems and test them for reliability in our laboratories in accelerated aging tests (for example under temperature cycling conditions).

Using state-of-the-art methods (Raman spectroscopy, ultrasound, ...), we then analyze the tested components for failure patterns and failure mechanisms.

In addition to existing analysis methods, our research group is developing its own electrical test methods with which the reliability of electronic components can be measured non-destructively in-situ and ex-situ (Automated Transient Thermal Analysis).

Using finite element (FE) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods, we simulate the physical relationships of electronic systems and can thus decisively optimize their thermal management, for example.

Currently, our research group consists of about 15 scientific staff members, of which about 10 are pursuing a doctorate.

 

Contact

Head of Research Group Microelectronics Packaging
Prof. Dr. Gordon Elger
Phone: +49 841 9348-2840
Room: A114
E-Mail:

Open positions

If you are interested in vacancies for student work within the research group, please send an email with CV to gordon.elger@thi.de.